Dating pregnancy straight after a miscarriage

"The risk of catching an infectious disease far outweighs the risk from vaccination." For advice on specific travel vaccinations, consult your GP or midwife. Fatigue and dizziness are common during pregnancy so it's important on car journeys to drink regularly, eat natural, energy-giving foods (such as fruit and nuts) and stop regularly for a break.

Some anti-malaria tablets aren't safe to take in pregnancy so consult your GP for advice. Keep the air circulating in the car and wear your seatbelt with the cross strap between your breasts and the lap strap across your pelvis under your bump, not across your bump.

This isn't something to worry about, but it's helpful to talk about it with your partner.

This can be a time to explore and experiment together.

Sex with your partner on top can become uncomfortable quite early in pregnancy, not just because of the bump, but because your breasts might be tender.

It's a good idea to take your maternity medical records (sometimes called handheld notes) with you so you can give doctors the relevant information if necessary. Make sure your travel insurance covers you for any eventuality, such as pregnancy-related medical care during labour, premature birth and the cost of changing the date of your return trip if you go into labour.

Some women prefer not to travel in the first 12 weeks of pregnancy because of nausea and feeling very tired during these early stages.

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